Momus: The Podcast

Recently named one of the top-ten art podcasts by The New York Times (March 2020), Momus: The Podcast promotes “criticism in conversation” on a variety of timely issues relating to contemporary art and the present moment. Momus publisher Sky Goodden, with co-producer and co-host Lauren Wetmore, delve into back rooms and white cubes, bringing Momus’s unique insistence on criticality into a more conversational register. In Season 1, leading artists, curators, and art writers from around the world weighed-in on topics ranging from the future of artist-run culture to the relevance of the Venice Biennale and the ubiquity of the artist residency. In Season 2, the podcast was devoted to the question of “What Makes Great Art?”, earning the Times mention, and coverage in Art in America and Canadian Art. Season 3 was launched in early April 2020, amid the coronavirus pandemic and through the racial reckoning spearheaded by the Movement for Black Lives. We circled the question “what’s changed – and what should?”, offering us an opportunity to reflect on past seismic shifts in history, and the equally loud cracks that can occur within an artist’s practice.

Momus: The Podcast has featured guests including Ebony L. Haynes, Margaux Williamson, Osei Bonsu, Jarrett Earnest, Isabel Lewis, Francis McKee, Daniel Baumann, Michelle Grabner, Nora N. Khan, Jacob Wren, Tyler Green, The White Pube, Sophia Al-Maria, and Sheila Heti, among many others.

In late November 2020, we will launch Season 4 of Momus: The Podcast, inviting art critics and journalists to talk about an important piece of their writing – texts that carry stories, that ran in prestigious publications to great acclaim, or that were killed under tense circumstances. Every two weeks, co-hosts Sky Goodden and Lauren Wetmore will ask a different writer to read their text to us, and then discuss how it came into being – its inspiration, construction, and impact. Stay tuned.


What Artists and Curators Do for Money

Season 4, Epsiode 1

November 2020

Season 4 of Momus: The Podcast invites art critics and journalists to talk about an important piece of their writing – texts that carry stories, that ran in prestigious publications to great acclaim, or that were killed under tense circumstances. Every two weeks, co-hosts Sky Goodden and Lauren Wetmore will ask a different writer to read their text to us, and then discuss how it came into being – its inspiration, construction, and impact.

To launch the season, Goodden interviews her co-host Wetmore about a piece that was published in Momus and was shortlisted for a 2016 International Award for Art Criticism, a sharp and farcical review of Manifesta 11: What Artist and Curators Do for Money, which demonstrates a rare example of curatorial criticism. Their conversation ranges from sharpening the perfect retort to writing in bed, with Wetmore reflecting on the driving impulse to write this, her only published review to date: “Like, who’s making this? How much are they getting paid? What process are they using to get this done? How are you, the curator, and your artist, and your intellectual conceit, tied to the making of this work? Because isn’t that the essentially interesting part of the commissioning process? We’re there to be able to touch in some oblique way how this came to be. And if we want to pretend that it came to be out of thin air – as I find a lot of curators want to pretend – then I’m simply not interested. Because it’s not true.”

Lauren Wetmore is co-host and co-producer of Momus: The Podcast. and a curatorial fellow at Mudam, Luxembourg.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, with assistant production from Mitra Shreeram, and music by Ulysses Castellanos. Thank you to our small team, and to our listeners and contributors. Please visit our Patreon account for ways to support the publication and podcast.

Look for us on Google PodcastsStitcheriTunes, and other podcast apps.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 24:
“What’s Changed, and What Should?” with The White Pube

August 2020

The White Pube: Gabrielle de la Puente, Zarina Muhammad. Photo: Ollie Adegboye.

In the final episode of Season 3, which has been devoted to the question of “what’s changed, and what should?”, Sky Goodden speaks to The White Pube, a UK-based art-criticism collective comprised of Zarina Muhammad and Gabriella de la Puente. Across five years of publishing, The White Pube has been celebrated for its insistence on “embodied criticism” and “sticky subjectivity,” its resistance to the star-review system of popular art criticism, and its practice of DIY art-publishing as institutional critique. “We cannot ever write in a way that denies ourselves,” concludes Muhammed. Their recent feature “FUCK THE POLICE, FUCK THE STATE, FUCK THE TATE: RIOTS AND REFORM” demonstrates an increasingly unrelenting politic, as well.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Thanks to Art Gallery of Guelph for their support of this episode, and to Gabriella and Zarina for their contribution.

Look for us on Google PodcastsStitcheriTunes, and other podcast apps.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 23:
“What’s Changed, and What Should?” with Sophia Al Maria

July 2020

Illustration by Ned Asta from Larry Mitchell and Ned Asta’s 1977 book “The Faggots & Their Friends Between Revolutions.”

For episode 23, Lauren Wetmore spoke with Sophia al Maria, a Qatari-American artist, writer, and filmmaker based in London. Author of publications including Sad SackVirgin With A Memory, and her autobiography The Girl Who Fell To Earth, Al Maria has also written for Triple Canopy, Bidoun, and Harper’s Magazine. Her work as an artist has been exhibited internationally at institutions including Tate Britain, Gwangju Biennale, and the New Museum in New York. She has written Litte Birds, a television series based on Anais Nin’s erotic writings, which will premiere on Sky Atlantic in August 2020.

This wide-ranging conversation takes on a speculative tone, coming from the pivotal point of three months into corona lockdown Al Maria says, “It’s really important to hold steady. To kindle and keep alive those first moments of shock.” Touching on central interests in Al Maria’s practice such as science fiction and popular culture, Wetmore and Al Maria also consider the implications of intimacy in our new touchless world, “remembering how important it is to keep that flame of erotic power alive, especially when it feels difficult and hard to fantasize.” In a difficult moment between the inaction of confinement and the ramping up of social unrest, Al Maria points towards strategies of hope. “I think linking social justice with environmental action or non-movement and non-consumption will make thinking about the future less harrowing.”

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Thanks to InterAcess for their support in this episode and to Sophia Al Maria for her contribution.

Look for us on Google PodcastsStitcheriTunes, and other podcast apps.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 22:
“What’s Changed, and What Should?” with Ebony L. Haynes

June 2020

Kandis Williams, still from “Aristaeus EURYDICE Hecate,” 2018. Performer Cassandra Momah. Courtesy the artist and Night Gallery.

For episode 22, Lauren Wetmore spoke with Ebony L. Haynes, a gallerist, curator, and writer. Haynes is the Director of Martos Gallery in New York, and Shoot the Lobster in New York and LA. Active for the past ten years, Haynes has insisted on the meaningful inclusion of Black artists and professionals in the contemporary artworld. In this potent conversation, she discusses her experiences as a Black female art dealer in a sexist and racist industry, where her significant contributions continue to do the powerful work of redressing injustice while elevating talent. She says, “I’m here because I’m supposed to be here.”

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Thanks to Waddington’s for their support in this episode and to Ebony L. Haynes for her vital contribution.

Look for us on Google PodcastsStitcheriTunes, and other podcast apps.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 21:
“What’s Changed, and What Should?” with Coco Fusco

June 2020

Luis Manuel Otero Alcántara, “León,” 2014.

For episode 21, Sky Goodden spoke with Coco Fusco, the legendary Cuban-American critic, artist, educator, and art historian. Speaking from the center of a pandemic, and on the brink of a significant wave of civil unrest and anti-racist protest, Fusco circled themes relevant to each crisis, looping them through the lens of Cuban history and the seismic shifts it is currently undergoing, in relation to protest, artistic freedom, and criticism against the government.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Thanks to Zalucky Contemporary for their support in this episode, and to Coco Fusco for her vital contribution.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Look for us on Google PodcastsStitcheriTunes, and other podcast apps.

Episode 20:
“What’s Changed, and What Should?” with Daniel Blanga Gubbay

May 2020

“Four Rooms,” 1995 (film still). Directed by Allison Anders, Alexandre Rockwell, Robert Rodriguez, Quentin Tarantino.

For this episode, still circling the question “what’s changed, and what should?”, Lauren Wetmore spoke with Brussels-based curator Daniel Blanga Gubbay, the artistic co-director of the historic Kunstenfestivaldesarts. Gubbay has worked as an educator and an independent curator for public programs including Manifesta, Palermo (2018); and was head of the Department of Arts and Choreography (ISAC) of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of Brussels. He holds a PhD in Cultural Studies from Palermo and Berlin. Reflecting on the material consequences of halting a massive festival like his, and fighting to keep artists paid and visa applications underway, Gubbay warns that “when you reduce the whole artistic process to the event, if the event disappears, you risk making that process invisible.”

Momus: The Podcast – recently named one of The New York Times‘ top-ten art podcasts – is issuing new podcast episodes every two weeks. Look for us on Google PodcastsStitcheriTunes, and other podcast apps.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 19:
“What’s Changed, and What Should?” with Johanna Fateman

May 2020

Agnes Pelton, “Sea Change,” 1931. Courtesy of The Whitney.


For this episode, Sky Goodden spoke with art writer and musician Johanna Fateman, a regular contributor to The New Yorker, a contributing editor at Artforum, and a frequent critic for 4Columns.org. Fateman co-owns the historic Seagull Salon in New York City, and is, as Lauren notes, “riot grrrl queer royalty” for her involvement in bands like Le Tigre. As Fateman spoke from New York, the epicenter of the pandemic, there were ambulances blazing in the background; her son was home from school, her partner was recovering from the COVID virus, her salon was holding on by a thread, and through it all, Fateman was fittingly working on her first book of dystopic fiction. However, with a measure of surprising calm, she said, “I just think now is not the time to pressure yourself to be original; I really don’t think there’s something original to say right now. I think this is the time to drill down on what’s common to us, and be honestly reflective.”

Momus: The Podcast – recently named one of The New York Times‘ top-ten art podcasts – is doubling down and scaling up in Season 3, issuing new podcasts every two weeks and staring directly at our present crisis, with an eye to both history and potential. Look for us on Google PodcastsStitcheriTunes, and other popular podcast apps.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 18:
“What’s Changed, and What Should?” with Alessandro Bava

April 2020

Le Corbusier, sketch from ‘Maison des Hommes’, 1942.


Momus: The Podcast launched Season 3 with the question “what’s changed – and what should?”, which we continue with Alessandro Bava, an architect and writer based in Naples, Italy. Bava makes exhibitions, installations, interiors, and architecture projects, and writes on the poetics, politics, and technologies that produce contemporary space. In conversation with Lauren Wetmore, Bava reflects, “If your house becomes a place of labor, this radically changes the status of the home and its place in the market as a commodity. […] Three months ago the machine was running and there was nothing stopping it. In a way, now there is a chance to imagine an alternative.”

Momus: The Podcast – recently named one of The New York Times‘ top-ten art podcasts – is doubling down and scaling up in Season 3, issuing new podcasts every two weeks and staring directly at our present crisis, with an eye to both history and potential. Look for us on Google Podcasts, Stitcher, iTunes, and other popular podcast apps.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 17:
“What’s Changed, and What Should?” with Eleanor Nairne

April 2020

Joseph Cornell, “Towards the Blue Peninsula (For Emily Dickinson),” 1953. The Robert Lehrman Art Trust, courtesy of Aimee and Robert Lehrman. Photo The Robert Lehrman Art Trust.

Momus: The Podcast launches Season 3 with the question “what’s changed – and what should?” with curator and art historian Eleanor Nairne. This prompt was already set, but with the emerging pandemic and its irreversible effects on our economy, cultural metabolism, relationship to art, sense of agency, and connection to one other, there has never been a better time to ask it. This conversation also allows us an opportunity to reflect on past seismic shifts in history, and the equally loud cracks that can occur within an artist’s practice. How do we seize this historical moment, and what do we wish to see change?

Eleanor Nairne is Curator at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, where her exhibitions include Lee Krasner: Living Colour (2019-20) and Basquiat: Boom for Real (2017-18). She is a regular catalogue writer, a contributor to publications including The London Review of Books and frieze and is a former Jerwood Writer in Residence. Prior to the Barbican she was curator of the Artangel Collection at the Tate. In speaking with Lauren Wetmore for the season’s inaugural episode, she reflects, “Has this been a time of reflection? No. It’s been a time of faulty connections and stumbling video calls. [But] I don’t want to go back to business as usual. I want to go back with a memory of this time imprinted in a valuable way.”

Momus: The Podcast – recently named one of The New York Times‘ top-ten art podcasts – is doubling down and scaling up in Season 3, issuing new podcasts every two weeks and staring directly at our present crisis, with an eye to both history and potential. Look for us on Google Podcasts, Stitcher, iTunes, and other popular podcast apps.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 16:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Margaux Williamson

February 2020

Margaux Williamson, “Living Room,” 2020.


As we continue to circle the question “what makes great art?”, Sky Goodden spoke with Margaux Williamson, a slow painter who gives the greatest primacy to the work of her work, and to the thinking-through that the work requires. Based in Toronto, and known for both her intense focus in the studio and her community-building in Toronto’s art scene, Williamson speaks with humor and heart about where her  friends show up in her art, and the soft focus that painting requires. ‘People can be easily impressed by skill, and I know that’s not what art is.’

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Our many thanks to Williamson for her reflective contribution to this episode. Our thanks as well to the Banff Centre for their support.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 15:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Isabel Lewis

November 2019

Isabel Lewis, “Poolside Pastoral,” 2019. Faena Art in Buenos Aires. Photograph by Lolo Bonfanti.


For this month’s episode circling the question “what makes great art?”, Lauren Wetmore spoke with Berlin-based artist Isabel Lewis. Lewis was trained in classical ballet and carries its impression through a practice that marries philosophy, choreography, storytelling, and sensory aesthetics. She insists, “There is nothing neutral about the body.”

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Our many thanks to Lewis for her eloquent contribution to this episode.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 14:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Jarrett Earnest

October 2019

Lisa Yuskavage, “The Toasters,” 2019. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner Gallery.


For this month’s episode, towards our season’s question, “what makes great art?”, Sky Goodden spoke with artist, curator, and writer Jarrett Earnest. Earnest is the editor behind the recent compilation of New Yorker critic Peter Schjeldahl’s writing, titled Hot, Cold, Heavy, Light (Abrams, 2019), which highlights Schjeldahl’s more risk-taking and experimental art writing from venues like The Village Voice, in addition to his most enduring criticism from The New Yorker. In 2018, Earnest published What it Means to Write About Art (David Zwirner Books), a master compendium of fresh, vulnerable, and reflective interviews with the legends of American art criticism. In the spring of 2019, he curated Young and Evil at David Zwirner, which re-centered the gay artists who pivoted away from “the prevailing trend toward abstraction in the early 20th-century.” His conversation with Goodden encircles his approach to reading and writing, the significance of storytelling, and the heightened relevance of the question “what is art?” 

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Our many thanks to Jarrett for his probing contribution to this episode. And our many thanks to Art Toronto for their support.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 13:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Francis McKee

September 2019

Janine Antoni, “Lick and Lather,” 1993-94. Courtesy the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York.

For this month’s episode, still circling the question “what makes great art?”, Lauren Wetmore enters into a searching conversation with Irish curator and writer Francis McKee. McKee is the Director of the Centre for Contemporary Art Glasgow, teaches at the Glasgow School of Art, writes books, and curates in other capacities, as well. He speaks with Wetmore about maintaining a relationship to the real world, and to the peripheries, in art.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Our many thanks to Francis for his meditative contribution to this episode. Our thanks to EXPO Chicago and Momenta Biennale de l’image for their support.

Episode 12:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Katerina Gregos

August 2019

Francisco de Goya, “Que Valor! (What Courage!),” plate 7 of “The Disasters of War” series, 1809.


Continuing with our pursuit of the question “What makes great art?”,  Lauren Wetmore sits down with Greek art historian, curator, and writer Katerina Gregos, in Brussels. Their conversation builds on a quote from Gregos’s recent exhibition The Anatomy of Political Melancholy, hosted by the Schwartz Foundation at the Athens Conservatory

“We are increasingly witnesses to the debasement of political language, the infantilization and polarization of political debate; the growth of a simplified discourse that panders to collective fears rather than addressing the real, pressing questions; the lack of accountability from politicians, and of course, ‘fake truth’ and ‘alternative facts’. Clearly there is something profoundly wrong with contemporary politics.”

What follows is a discussion that exchanges this quote’s “politics” for “art,” and interrogates the conditions by which we frame political comment in exhibition-making.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Our many thanks to Katerina Gregos for her stirring contribution to this episode.

You can stream the episode above, or subscribe/download it on Google PlayiTunes, and Stitcher.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

 

Episode 11:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Jinn Bronwen Lee

June 2019

Pieter Bruegel the Elder, “Two Chained Monkeys,” 1562.

As we continue our season-long exploration of “What makes great art?”, Sky Goodden sat down with Jinn Bronwen Lee, an artist based in Chicago. They discuss old master painting, the effect of our viewing environments on art, and the power of long looking. Lee is a painter currently thinking through the idea of “funk,” after Dr. Cornel West, and Samuel Beckett’s “Mess” as a way of life and practice. She is currently an artist in residence at Theaster Gates’s Rebuild Foundation (2018-19).

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. We would like to thank The Bentway for their support. And, of course, our many thanks to Jinn Bronwen Lee for her deeply thoughtful contribution to this episode.

You can stream the episode above, or subscribe/download it on Google PlayiTunes, and Stitcher.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 10:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Dushko Petrovich

May 2019

Dushko Petrovich, “Father Tongue,” 2012.


In our 10th episode, we continue our season-long exploration of the question, “What makes great art,” speaking to essential voices of our time about their experiences of seeking it. What follows is an interview between Momus Publisher Sky Goodden and Dushko Petrovich. Born in Ecuador and based in Chicago, Dushko is the chair of the New Arts Journalism program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and works in several critical and creative capacities, including as publisher and artist. He is the co-founder of the beloved Paper Monument, among others, and by all indications, the heart of his publishing activity is activist. In a searching conversation, Petrovich and Goodden land on their mutual desire and responsibility to foster a space for criticism and change. What makes great art? Petrovich argues that the metrics by which we know it are being actively altered.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. We would like to thank the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for their support. And, of course, our many thanks to Dushko Petrovich for his considered contribution to this episode.

You can stream the episode above, or subscribe/download it on Google PlayiTunes, and Stitcher.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 9:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Osei Bonsu

April 2019


In continuing our season-long exploration of the question “What makes great art?” co-hosts Lauren Wetmore and Sky Goodden speak to essential voices about what are we seeking – and so often missing – in our experience of art. What follows is an interview with the British-Ghanaian curator, critic, and art historian Osei Bonsu. Based in Paris and London, Bonsu focuses on transnational histories of art. In conversation with Lauren Wetmore, he contemplates how we have exchanged a generosity of thought for a culture of transaction, and how the experience of meeting great art can be ahistorical – out of place and out of time.

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. We would like to thank Esker Foundation for their support. And, of course, our many thanks to Osei Bonsu for his deeply meaningful contribution to this episode.

You can stream the episode above, or subscribe/download it on Google PlayiTunes, and Stitcher.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 8:
“What Makes Great Art?” with Jeanne Randolph and Sheila Heti

March 2019

Still from “Gummo,” 1997, starring Jacob Reynolds. Directed by Harmony Korine.

What makes “great art”? How do we account for what Gertrude Stein called the “itness” of art, and what are we seeking – and so often missing – in our experience of art? In brief, bright 30-minute episodes, Momus: The Podcast’s second season will follow co-hosts Lauren Wetmore and Sky Goodden as they speak with writers, curators, filmmakers, novelists, and artists about this searching. They ask, “What are their experiences with the ‘itness’, and with tracing it or trying to replicate it in their own work and in their lives?” In the first episode of the season, Goodden and Wetmore speak to performance artist, ficto-critic, and psychoanalyst Jeanne Randolph, as well as celebrated novelist Sheila Heti, who memorably says of art, “The person that loves it is the one that is right.”

Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. We would like to thank Tellwell Books and Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival for their support. And of course our deepest thanks to Jeanne Randolph and Sheila Heti for their memorable contributions to this episode.

You can stream the episode above, or subscribe/download it on Google PlayiTunes, and Stitcher.

If you would like to inquire about advertising opportunities or other forms of support, please contact Sky Goodden at skygoodden@momus.ca.

Episode 7:
“Over, Again and Again,” Renewing Canada’s Artist-Run Culture

October 2018

Screenshot of ARCA’s online database and interactive map of artist-run centres and collectives from across Canada (http://directory.arca.art/)

In Momus: The Podcast‘s 7th episode, we have brought together a group of artists, curators, and scholars to update the conversation around Artist-Run Culture in Canada. It’s a well-known history, one approaching legend, in this country: the emergence of artist-run centers seeking to address a lack of options for artist representation while forming a network across a vast geography; and then their professionalization, one approaching an institutionalization that mirrors the very thing they were made to contravene. Now, in a moment of large shifts across the arts sector, with a recent change to our country’s funding models, and a refocusing of our social values on historically underrepresented groups, our relationship to a Canadian cultural legacy is up for renewal.

Momus: The Podcast is Co-Produced and Co-Hosted by Sky Goodden and Lauren Wetmore. We would like to thank all our contributors to this episode: Caitlin Jones, Peter Morin, Peggy Gale, Sylvie Gilbert and Francois Dion; with thanks to Lorna Brown for her text. Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and assistant production from Mitra Shreeram. Season 1 of Momus: The Podcast is brought to you with the help of the Canada Council for the Arts “New Chapter” grant.”

You can stream the episode above, or subscribe/download it on Google PlayiTunes, and Stitcher.

Episode 6:
An Ethics of Abundance with Jacob Wren and Dayna Danger

September 2018

Dayna Danger,
“Gi zhaa goo tha mik, Full Moon Tibikigiizhiswabigoon Ikwe,” 2016. Courtesy the artist.

For this episode of our Criticism in Conversation series, a writer and collaborative performer, Jacob Wren, speaks with artist Dayna Danger, about the line between empowerment and objectification and the meaning of community in both their work. Danger is a 2Spirit/Queer, Metis/Saulteaux/Polish artist whose images highlight and queer power dynamics, kinship, representation, and sexuality. Wren makes collaborative performances, exhibitions and literature, including 2014’s Polyamorous Love Song and this year’s Authenticity is a Feeling, a hybrid of history, performance theory, and memoir. Together they cover a lot of ground, from personal narratives and community relationships to speaking against silence and apathy. We also receive a set of strategies for working and living in capitalist and colonial society, including creating your own rituals and adopting an ethics of abundance.

This episode is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea and production assistance by Mitra Shreeram. It’s brought to you with the help of the Canada Council for the Arts “New Chapter” grant.

You can stream the episode above, or subscribe/download it on Google PlayiTunes, and Stitcher.

We thank NTS Radio for syndicating and hosting Momus: The Podcast.

Episode 5:
Conflict of Interest with Tyler Green and Catherine G. Wagley

September 2018

Nancy Spero, “The Dance,” 1993. Courtesy of Galerie Lelong.

In this episode of “Criticism in Conversation”, two art critics and historians discuss “conflict of interest” in contemporary art criticism. Tyler Green, the host of the popular Modern Art Notes Podcast  and Catherine G. Wagley, a critic who regularly publishes with artnet News, the LA Review of Books, and Momus, frame the stakes and risks of a critic writing on contemporary – and even historical – figures in art, especially in light of the market’s increasingly firm grip on our discourse. We can hear them debate the most ethical approach to navigating nepotism, allyship, and critical distance in contemporary art writing. And as a centerpiece to this discussion, they cite the recent example of an art historian outing two leading art publications for acquiescing to the control exercised by a leading gallery over the material published on its artists. In an artworld where conflict-of-interest is endemic and normalized, our attention should be heightened, especially regarding the powers that dictate the terms by which we critique, historicize, and debate. 

Momus: The Podcast is co-produced and co-hosted by Sky Goodden and Lauren Wetmore. This episode is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea and production assistance by Mitra Shreeram. It’s brought to you with the help of the Canada Council for the Arts “New Chapter” grant.

You can stream the episode above, or download it on Google Play, iTunes, and Stitcher.

We thank NTS Radio for syndicating and hosting Momus: The Podcast.

 

Episode 4:
Art and Technology Criticism with Nora Khan and Mike Pepi

August 2018

Image courtesy of Shutterstock video: https://www.shutterstock.com/video/clip-27149662-high-quality-video-man-vr-glasses-on


Two art and technology critics, Nora Khan and Mike Pepi, discuss pushing for a rigorous critical discourse in a creative field that can flatten evaluative distinctions in favor of zealotry for invention. “Criticism of a tool that’s presented as neutral when it really is a piece of social engineering is incredibly hard to do, and there really isn’t a model for criticism in this space,” says Khan. In this far-ranging discussion that touches on the critical distance and yet humanism required of writing on the internet, surveillance, and AI, Khan and Pepi assert that tools aren’t divorced from their makers, and artwork is never post-human – nor post-critique.

“Criticism in Conversation” is a series by Momus: The Podcast, and is co-produced and co-hosted by Lauren Wetmore and Sky Goodden. This episode of Momus: The Podcast is edited by Jacob Irish, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and production assistance by Mitra Shreeram. It’s brought to you with the help of the Canada Council for the Arts “New Chapter” grant, and is syndicated by NTS Radio.

You can stream the episode above, or download it on Google Play, iTunes, and Stitcher.

We thank NTS Radio for syndicating and hosting Momus: The Podcast.

Episode 3:
Art Criticism vs. Journalism with Catherine G. Wagley and Julia Halperin

August 2018

Agnes Martin, “Untitled #1”, 2003. Courtesy of Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris © 2015 Agnes Martin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

In the first episode of Momus’s new “Criticism in Conversation” podcast series, an art critic and an art journalist parse the differing responsibilities and approaches of their craft. Catherine G. Wagley (a Momus contributing editor, and a critic for ARTNews and The Los Angeles Review of Books, among others) and Julia Halperin (Executive Editor of artnet News, and former Museums Editor for The Art Newspaper) compare notes and find common ground as they consider, in particular, the example of a potent piece of journalism published by Halperin concerning the influence of five commercial galleries on worldwide institutional programming. Wagley wonders if this kind of reporting isn’t also the province of criticism, as these politics affect what we see and how.

“Criticism in Conversation” is a new series by Momus: The Podcast, and is co-produced and co-hosted by Lauren Wetmore and Sky Goodden. This episode of Momus: The Podcast is edited by Angela Shackel, features original music by Kyle McCrea, and production assistance by Mitra Shreeram. It’s brought to you with the help of the Canada Council for the Arts “New Chapter” grant, and is syndicated by NTS Radio.

You can stream the episode above, or download it on Google Play, iTunes, and Stitcher.

We thank NTS Radio for syndicating and hosting Momus: The Podcast.

 

Episode 2:
The Artist Residency

December 2017

Celia Perrin Sidarous, “Vent, Arles” (detail), 2008. Courtesy the artist.

The artist residency has risen to the top of the artworld’s global economy and increasing professionalization, becoming one of the key features of contemporary art practice. Momus publisher and podcast host Sky Goodden leads an overdue critical conversation on this phenomenon and its consequences for art practice in the 21st century. Featuring international voices close to the subject, Goodden – joined by co-host Lauren Wetmore, a Brussels-based curator and writer – discusses the risks and rewards of an actively-commercializing enterprise, and where it came out of.

Momus: The Podcast episode 2 features guests Daniel Baumann (director of Kunsthalle Zürich), Kristy Trinier (artist, curator, and former Banff Centre director), Aaron Cezar (founding director of Delfina Foundation), Michelle Grabner (artist, educator, and artistic director of Front International), and the co-directors of Beirut residency marra.tein, Jared McCormick and George Awde.

We’d like to thank the Canada Council for the Arts’s New Chapter grant for its support in making this podcast’s first season possible. Momus: The Podcast is co-produced by Angela Shackel and Sky Goodden; and edited by Angela Shackel, with assistance from Braden Labonte. We would like to thank our assistant producer, Mitra Shreeram; our composer and music editor Kyle McCrea; and this episode’s co-host, Lauren Wetmore.

You can stream the episode above, or download it on Google Play, iTunes, and Stitcher.

We thank NTS Radio for syndicating and hosting Momus: The Podcast.

 

Episode 1:
The Venice Biennale

May 2017

Sarah Lucas, “Margot” (detail), 2015. © British Council and Sadie Coles Gallery.

Welcome to the pilot episode of Momus: The Podcast. For our first broadcast, we focus on the historic Venice Biennale as the 57th edition opens to the public. We air a conversation on its history, institution, relevance, and potential, with insight arriving from a group of critics, curators, artists, and gallerists speaking to us from around the world. In this vibrant and myriad discussion, we question this event’s potential for political comment; its profile amid a “festivalist” biennial culture; its emphasis on nationalism; and the latest edition’s success.

Our pilot contributors include Morgan Quaintance, Andrew Berardini, Kimberlee Córdova, Saelan Twerdy, Sandra Paikowsky, Catherine G. Wagley, Alison HugillMitch Speed, and your host, Sky Goodden.

We’d like to thank the Ontario Arts Council for its support in making this podcast’s first episode possible. Momus: The Podcast is co-produced by Angela Shackel and Sky Goodden; and edited by Angela Shackel. We would like to thank our assistant producer, Mitra Shreeram; and our music composer, Kyle McCrea.

You can stream the episode above, or download it on Google Play, iTunes, and Stitcher.

We thank NTS Radio for syndicating and hosting Momus: The Podcast.